About Jack

Now with the luxury of time, Jack put pen to paper and wrote Daniel’s Prize, his first book

Jack Crawford

“Owing to his boat handling skills, he was granted the affectionate sobriquet of ‘Captain Cock Up’.”

Jack Crawford was born in 1947 and spent the first eleven years of his life living in a council flat in Stoke Newington, London. At that time it was not one of the capital’s more respectable areas, noted mainly for the gangs of criminals that proliferated after the Second World War.

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Jack Crawford was born in 1947 and spent the first eleven years of his life living in a council flat in Stoke Newington, London. At that time it was not one of the capital’s more respectable areas, noted mainly for the gangs of criminals that proliferated after the Second World War. At the age of eleven his father’s job as a custom officer, saw the family move from the narrow backstreets to the open countryside of rural Northern Ireland. It was at this time he developed an appreciation of the countryside which stayed with him all his life.

Here he attended Foyle College in Londonderry. He was never the most enthusiastic of pupils and, after gaining a clutch of ‘O’ levels, he decided to leave. Four days after terminating his education and with twelve pounds in his pocket, he arrived back in England. He found employment performing such roles as a deckhand on a Dutch coaster, a milkman, a labourer, shop assistant and a trainee company manager.

In 1966 he joined British Customs and Excise as a uniformed officer. His duties included driving patrol cars along the border between Northern and Southern Ireland and working at various ports and airports. At airports he checked passengers’ luggage and monitored aircrew. At ports his main role was searching all areas of ships that had arrived from abroad to look for contraband.

He then graduated to become a specialist investigation officer where he was part of a team that investigated major drugs gangs, smuggling of commercial goods and sensitive military equipment and large scale tax frauds. Intelligence was relied on to identify criminal gangs who were then targeted and evidence was gathered by means of covert mobile and static surveillance. He arrested and interviewed, under caution, many suspects who were then brought before the courts.

As time moved on, he felt that there was more to life than chasing bad guys. In 1990 he began studying for a law degree at the University of Central England in Birmingham and in July 1994, he obtained an LL.B (Hons), (2.1). He resigned from Customs and Excise and, for a year, worked for one of the major firms of accountants as its customs investigation manager. This saw him representing companies being investigated for alleged tax fraud by his former colleagues. After a year in accountancy he joined the legal team of one of the world’s leading tobacco companies.

Here much of his work involved the application of EU legislation so as to enable more tax and business efficient processes. He undertook various “fire -fighting” matters which usually involved paperwork at border crossings. He also lectured to those customs authorities that were about to join the EU. He assisted various customs and finance authorities in identifying counterfeit product and the areas from where it was sourced. His work involved constant travel, mainly to the EU and Central and Eastern Europe. After ten years of airport lounges, he took early retirement. At the time of his retirement he was a senior executive with his own office which overlooked the  Thames. Stoke Newington was only three miles away. Not far in geographical terms but a considerable distance in the stepping stones of life.  Now he enjoys relaxed holidays with his wife Joan and spends time at his cottage in a small Cornish fishing village. Here, owing to his boat handling skills, he was granted the affectionate sobriquet of “Captain Cock Up.”

Throughout his life he had always considered writing and his thoughts increasingly turned to the idea of producing some form of literature. Now with the luxury of time, he put pen to paper and wrote Daniel’s Prize, his first book.

Jack has been very happily married to Joan since 1969 and has a son, daughter in law and two granddaughters.

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Born
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Began study for Law degree
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Novels written so far
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Happily married to Joan since

“Actual experience of the subject matter gives an opportunity to write realistically.”

“I like to write with at least some degree of reality. My previous investigation work into criminal offences allows me to do that.” – Jack Crawford, 5 Oct. 2014

Books: See my published and soon to be published books

My books are available to buy on Amazon.co.uk either paperback or the Kindle edition.

Daniel’s Prize

This is a story of murder, corruption, greed, deceit and the consequences of family secrets.

It opens at a lonely and dilapidated farm run by the sole occupants, a father assisted by his son. Theirs is a cold and distant relationship whereby the son, who is regarded by many as being socially inadequate, feels cheated out of the money due to him for work done on the farm.

The father, a miserable scowling man, is seen as being very tight fisted and demands that his son works on the farm for little or no pay. The son’s anger grows.

One day the father returns from a market in the nearby town where he is seen in possession of a wallet bulging with cash. As usual he has had too much to drink.

Later in the afternoon, the son finds his father shot dead in the farm house. The police are called to conduct enquiries. The officers, an inspector and his constable, have reputations as being lazy and incompetent. It is subsequently found that a lottery ticket bought by the farmer on the day of his demise has won a fortune.

The police officers take the view that the son, the farmer’s only living relative, is an easy target for them to relieve him of his father’s fortune which is now his inheritance. Initially a joint plan is devised to obtain the money. However mistrust and greed come into play and the officers set about devising their own schemes for enrichment.

The pursuit of the murderer is all but abandoned and tensions amongst the officers rise. Their corrupt actions lead to disaster and downfall.

Buy ‘Daniel’s Prize’ at Amazon

Sarah’s Voyage

A lone mysterious traveller arrives at a remote Cornish fishing village and starts to ask questions about the statue of a young man seated in the cockpit of yacht…

He encounters the local ferry skipper who is initially reluctant to converse with him. However the ferry skipper has a feeling that he and the stranger had met before.

The ferryman unveils a mystical story of shipwreck and death that would stretch the credibility of most people. However the stranger does not discount what he has heard.  When the stranger leaves the ferryman asks an innocuous question, however the reply he receives only adds further intrigue to the story.  

This story of ten thousand words is offered as a free download to visitors to this site.

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Details about ‘Daniels Prize’

  • Paperback: 222 pages

  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (4 Sept. 2014)

  • Language: English

  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.3 x 22.9 cm

  • ISBN-10: 1501052489

  • ISBN-13: 978-1501052484

FREE short stories

At the request of several of my readers, I have made available unpublished short stories for you to read online for free.

If you like them, please let me know: I would love to hear from – Contact me.

Read my blog

Keep up with the latest from Jack Crawford. Look out for short stories published from time to time.

To both my readers.

By |January 5th, 2016|

First, I would like to thank Gerry Hamilton for his very kind words in respect of Daniel’s Prize. Gerry, I have tried to contact you, but without success. If you pick this up, could you […]

Sequel to Daniel’s Prize

By |May 27th, 2015|

My first stab at writing a book was Daniel’s Prize. Originally intended to be a short story, it just grew and grew. To use the jargon of the media of theatre, films and books, it […]

Sarah’s Voyage

By |May 18th, 2015|

The small slopping waves in the broad estuary lapped, with casual licks, against the stout and ancient quay wall with a rhythmic soft sibilance. The little village, that tumbled down the hill to the water’s […]

Amazon Reviews: Some of my 5 star reviews!

Did you enjoy my novels? Something you would like to share with other readers or give feedback to Jack? Welcoming all types of reviews.

“A distinctively British crime thriller and gripping read”

“The inspired author masterfully builds intrigue and keeps you guessing throughout with unexpected twists and turns. The characters are captivating and you feel the book just scratches the surface of their personalities with the last few chapters leaving you wanting more. Hopefully a sequel is on its way.” – Paul Andrew Kay. 5 Oct. 2014

“Great read, not going to give plot away. Looking forward to next instalment.”
John Irving, 17 Oct 2014
“This is an exciting read with plenty of twists to the storyline and interesting characters. I would like to know what happens to Daniel as he is an intriguing personality and it’s difficult to guess what he will do next…….”
Chris Y, 27 Sept 2014
“The whodunit format is the bed on which the equally intriguing police corruption storyline is hung. Both strands keep the pages turning but it’s the corruption storyline which kept me hooked with the main police character Curran set to become a classic anti-hero……”
Melly C, 14 Sept 2014
“This really is an excellent book, not only a fascinating plot, but also extremely thought provoking. The author is clearly an expert in both law and law enforcement and I do hope Jack Crawford writes not only a sequel to Daniel’s Prize but also other books which embrace his area of expertise.”
David Perry, 20 March 2015
“A great book with a storyline that builds and builds into an ever intriguing plot with numerous twists and turns keeping the reader hooked…..A brilliant first novel we can only hope for a sequel, these characters are just too good for us not to hear from them again.

Two of us have read it and believe me it’s tough listening to the exclamations of the reader when you are waiting to get your hands on the book to read it too!!”

Miss Jane Wheeler, 27 Oct 2014

Daniel’s Prize

This is a story of murder, corruption, greed, deceit and the consequences of family secrets.

It opens at a lonely and dilapidated farm run by the sole occupants, a father assisted by his son. Theirs is a cold and distant relationship whereby the son, who is regarded by many as being socially inadequate, feels cheated out of the money due to him for work done on the farm.

The father, a miserable scowling man, is seen as being very tight fisted and demands that his son works on the farm for little or no pay. The son’s anger grows.

One day the father returns from a market in the nearby town where he is seen in possession of a wallet bulging with cash. As usual he has had too much to drink.

Later in the afternoon, the son finds his father shot dead in the farm house. The police are called to conduct enquiries. The officers, an inspector and his constable, have reputations as being lazy and incompetent. It is subsequently found that a lottery ticket bought by the farmer on the day of his demise has won a fortune.

The police officers take the view that the son, the farmer’s only living relative, is an easy target for them to relieve him of his father’s fortune which is now his inheritance. Initially a joint plan is devised to obtain the money. However mistrust and greed come into play and the officers set about devising their own schemes for enrichment.

The pursuit of the murderer is all but abandoned and tensions amongst the officers rise. Their corrupt actions lead to disaster and downfall.

Buy ‘Daniel’s Prize’ at Amazon

Contact Jack

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